View Full Version : Traction Bar Ideas - Updated with pics of new traction bar


SaddleUp
09/02/05, 01:06 PM
Hey everyone, I'm looking for pics of your traction bars for ideas. No, I'm not going to run out to one of the vendors and buy theirs. Specifically I want to add a single bar to the center of my diff that goes up to a crossmember above using a shackle. I have a pretty good idea of how I want to make it but I also only want to build it once so I'm looking for pics and input. What problems did you have? Why did you do it a certain way? etc.

TIA,
Rick

Broncobowsher
09/02/05, 01:34 PM
Best one to buy in my opinion is the new one from Duff.

But if you are going to build one, this is what I did.
Axle wedges from a dead D30. Radius arm from a Bronco. Pivot at the frame is a little hard to understand, but you can understand the concept with a couple of pencils while sitting at your desk. Pivot is made from a pair of sway bar end links.

Best part is that it works and has no binding on the suspension travel!

MIDEVIL214
09/02/05, 02:14 PM
I Put the long travel traction bar on when they first came out. I noticed no difference on the ramp before and after installation. I was also real happy with its performance in the sand. Wheel hop in 2wd was kept to a min.
If you do design one, try and use a similar shackle design to allow the axle to move back when the suspension compresses.

ctowery
09/03/05, 09:27 AM
Lots of info on Pirate right now..the debate is ongoing over single bar vrs a std traction bar with 2 mount points.

Cary

Madgyver
09/03/05, 10:23 AM
Saddle,
Picture the old school traction bars for the EB that mounts ontop of the axle on both sides from KbarS or Duffs. I plan on using that to make 2 sets and installing it backward on the drivers side close the the driveshaft with a bracket built to mount the center pivot on the 3rd member and a short shackle on the front eye mounted to a fabricated x-member with humps to clear my exhaust.
http://www.jamesduff.com/images/eb/5301.jpg

mlogan24
09/03/05, 11:11 AM
Broncobowsher-I'm really diggin your cheap radius arm idea. Do you have any up close shots of where it attaches to the frame? I actually am having a hard time understanding how you hooked it up there.

lars
09/03/05, 11:31 PM
Without rendering an opinion myself (since I don't have any sort of antiwrap device myself yet) here is some interesting reading:

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?t=144993

http://www.4x4wire.com/jeep/tech/susp/axlewrap/

Seems like there are plenty of opinions. After doing the reading I'd be leaning towards some sort of ladder bar. Do post what you choose and how it works.

SaddleUp
09/04/05, 04:39 AM
Without rendering an opinion myself (since I don't have any sort of antiwrap device myself yet) here is some interesting reading:

http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?t=144993

http://www.4x4wire.com/jeep/tech/susp/axlewrap/

Seems like there are plenty of opinions. After doing the reading I'd be leaning towards some sort of ladder bar. Do post what you choose and how it works.
Good reading after I sorted through the crap. Basically confirms what I was looking at doing. It did give me an idea I might try on the shackle.

BUCKETOBOLTS
09/04/05, 04:19 PM
I've been looking for a good way to build a traction device myself. It gets very crowded between the frame rails when you start moving shocks inboard, adding traction arms, and trying to route the exhaust. I have debated on moving my shocks back outside the rails and use a Duff's or WH's style mounts, or having the exhaust run over the rail and out behind the rear of the wheel well. That would free up enough room to do a little fab work.

Does anyone remember the thread a few weeks ago where the fella used chain from the spring mount back over the axle and attached to the original shock mounts? I looks like it would limit pinion climb. But the axle may have more mechanical advantage over the links as it trys to wrap up.

lemnad
09/05/05, 07:56 PM
Here's my setup. Works very well.

ctowery
09/06/05, 08:18 AM
Looks very good, can you explane or get additional pictures of the front shackel attachment? I am confused as how it works ?:? , where does the front rod end go..attach to ?. the shackel looks to be welded solid..cant move?? Like I said confused.

Cary

Broncobowsher
09/06/05, 08:32 AM
Broncobowsher-I'm really diggin your cheap radius arm idea. Do you have any up close shots of where it attaches to the frame? I actually am having a hard time understanding how you hooked it up there.

No good pictures. I started with the idea of using a shackle, but evolved to the next level.

There are 2 sway bar links. One goes from the top of the frame to the arm and the other goes from the bottom of the frame to the arm. They are both mounted at 45 angle and the links are 90 to each other. Upon loading, the upper link is under ion load and the lower is under tension, so the load is split between the 2 links. The links pivot to allow the arm forward and rear movement so the suspension doesn’t bind.

ctowery
09/06/05, 10:07 AM
When ya get a chance please take some additional pictures, I only see 1 helm at the top. ?:?

Thanks, Cary

68 Broncoholic
09/06/05, 10:21 AM
Looks to be the same idea as this only the shackle is the other direction.
The heim is drilled and tapped into the cross bar.

http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/3944/aut24581fs.th.jpg (http://img373.imageshack.us/my.php?image=aut24581fs.jpg)

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/3689/bj180qb.th.jpg (http://img228.imageshack.us/my.php?image=bj180qb.jpg)

SaddleUp
09/06/05, 11:45 AM
After looking at several of these I noticed the Duff arm just has bushings (The rod end on it is just to adjust the position and will not effect articulation) where most of the others use a rod end or a johnny joint at the shackle end. I can't really see why the bushings will not work though. The arm will pretty much be working side to side pretty much the same as the leaf springs. I.E. It appears that there will not be any more flex in the bushings on the arm than the leaf springs. Going off this theory my first try at this will use just bushings. If that fails to articulate enough then I will try a double jointed shackle or will change an end out for a rod end.

Broncobowsher
09/06/05, 12:50 PM
The big reason I didn't go with a shackle is that most of the designs would allow the shackle to flip over if something got funky under the truck. A leaf spring shackle is a bit tough to accidently flip over, but I have seen it happen on trailers. Since most of these shackles look more like the flip prone trailer shackles then the onstrained vehicle shackles...

The last thing I want is a device that should be controlling my pinion angle to be forcing it into a bad position. Then you are under the truck looking at a suspension with a lot of stored up energy and no way to safely let that energy out.

SaddleUp
09/06/05, 06:32 PM
The big reason I didn't go with a shackle is that most of the designs would allow the shackle to flip over if something got funky under the truck. A leaf spring shackle is a bit tough to accidently flip over, but I have seen it happen on trailers. Since most of these shackles look more like the flip prone trailer shackles then the onstrained vehicle shackles...

The last thing I want is a device that should be controlling my pinion angle to be forcing it into a bad position. Then you are under the truck looking at a suspension with a lot of stored up energy and no way to safely let that energy out.
I think the only way this could happen on the setup I'm doing would be if the leafs broke or both spring center pins were sheared. I'll know more in a few days when I can play with the articulation. I have to replace my ball joints in front before I get too radical with it right now though.

SaddleUp
09/06/05, 11:31 PM
Here is what I came up with. Does this look like it will work? I haven't had a chance to flex it yet (Tomorrow's project is the front ball joints) but I don't see why it will not work. My only concern is hitting the left shock when the right side is up high.

Bronchole
09/07/05, 08:35 AM
That's about as close to what I want to end up with as I can think of. Th only thing I'd do different is use 1 spherical rod end in the shackel area to allow the traction bar to rotate with the axle housing while articulating.

I had not even thought of using square tubing for this. It makes perfect sense though. Easier fabbing on the ends and for the same height and width the square tubing will be stronger. I also like the axle housing attachment. This should work pretty dam good for you.

You have checked to make sure the shocks clear on full compression, right?

BUCKETOBOLTS
09/07/05, 09:56 AM
Saddleup, I dig the metalic paint! ;D I agree that the bushings should work fine when the bar twists during articulation. Though it wouldn't be a hard modifacation to do if you find you need a joint, just replace the mount on the x-member. What wall tubing did you use on your bar? Also does iit not make it hard to put oil in the rear with the bar mounted on the drivers side?

lars
09/07/05, 11:04 AM
Nice. I'll be interested to read about how it performs. How did you settle on the geometry? EG, length, location of pivots, length of shackle, etc. One interesting test might be to remove one of the bolts at the shackle end, then unload the rear suspension completely (set the frame on jack stands). See if you can get the bolt back in, and if not, how far off it is. That would give you an idea of how much bending, if any, that can be applied to the bar when the suspension moves.

SaddleUp
09/07/05, 12:07 PM
You have checked to make sure the shocks clear on full compression, right?
Not yet. I don't think it will be an issue but if it is then I'll probably think up a different way to mount the shocks. They've been hammered a few times already from the previous mount I had in there for them so I'm not out much if I end up denting one. (If you look through the pics you can see where the shocks have already been dented pretty good)

SaddleUp
09/07/05, 12:12 PM
Saddleup, I dig the metalic paint! ;D I agree that the bushings should work fine when the bar twists during articulation. Though it wouldn't be a hard modifacation to do if you find you need a joint, just replace the mount on the x-member. What wall tubing did you use on your bar? Also does iit not make it hard to put oil in the rear with the bar mounted on the drivers side?
It's the 2 stage stuff. First spray on the silver base coat and then after it dries put the color over it. The only thing I don't like about it is that it fades pretty fast if the sun hits it. (I use the same stuff on my beadlocks) I'm thinking about trying a clear coat over it next time I paint the beadlocks. Underneith where the sun normally doesn't hit it I haven't noticed any fading. Changing to a rod end would be half hour project. The tubing is 1 1/2" x 1/4" which is the same stuff I used on my cross member for my doubler. Adding oil shouldn't be a problem. I built the inside mount so it would leave access to the fill hole.

SaddleUp
09/07/05, 12:25 PM
Nice. I'll be interested to read about how it performs. How did you settle on the geometry? EG, length, location of pivots, length of shackle, etc. One interesting test might be to remove one of the bolts at the shackle end, then unload the rear suspension completely (set the frame on jack stands). See if you can get the bolt back in, and if not, how far off it is. That would give you an idea of how much bending, if any, that can be applied to the bar when the suspension moves.
Length was pretty much dictated by the available space. From what I read in one or two of the articles I used for research somewhere around 31" seems to be the right figure which is pretty close to what mine is. Other than this I tried to keep it tucked in as close to the driveline as possible (The hardest part was figuring this part out), along the same plane as the leafs, and the pivot point near the CV joint on the driveline. Right now there will definately be some binding in it because of the way my springs are deformed. I compensated for this to get the pinion angle back where it is supposed to be. In the next couple of days I'll run out and get a new set of springs (Jim said he would replace them but said I should address the problem first so it will not happen again) and then I can see how it really works. At that point I'll have a good opportuntity to play with it with the springs loose.

MikeM
09/07/05, 10:02 PM
Looks good to me, mine is sq tube and that has held up fine. My mounts have taken a beating though, apparently there is a lot of force being applied there! I would try to spread those loads out as much as you can so you don't tear your 9" housing. I doubt the shackle bushings will live long getting twisted but give it a try, if it works I"ll copy you and swap out my noisey tractor link.
Lars I was told for handling it should be longer if possible since it's trying to lift your truck. Also the passenger side was preferred to counter drivetrain torque on the suspension. But whatever it takes to get it in there is better than frying leafs,a driveshaft, output shaft, yoke, ect., etc. It will bind and your springs will have to bend a little to make up for that. I don't think anyones figured out a way around that yet. Sounds like a good job for someone who spends their days underground with a big spinning thingamajig.

lars
09/07/05, 10:21 PM
Looks good to me, mine is sq tube and that has held up fine. My mounts have taken a beating though, apparently there is a lot of force being applied there! I would try to spread those loads out as much as you can so you don't tear your 9" housing. I doubt the shackle bushings will live long getting twisted but give it a try, if it works I"ll copy you and swap out my noisey tractor link.
Lars I was told for handling it should be longer if possible since it's trying to lift your truck. Also the passenger side was preferred to counter drivetrain torque on the suspension. But whatever it takes to get it in there is better than frying leafs,a driveshaft, output shaft, yoke, ect., etc. It will bind and your springs will have to bend a little to make up for that. I don't think anyones figured out a way around that yet. Sounds like a good job for someone who spends their days underground with a big spinning thingamajig.

Make that a REALLY BIG spinning thingamajig. I forgot you had a wrap bar too. But how would you remember how well yours works, since it's been parked in the garage for so long? 8-) I was just in the garage crawling around under mine. I don't know howthehell I'll manage to stuff a wrap bar crossmember in there with all the other crap I have under my Bronco. If I ever manage to pull off some sort of geometric miracle, I'll report back.

SaddleUp
09/07/05, 11:02 PM
Looks good to me, mine is sq tube and that has held up fine. My mounts have taken a beating though, apparently there is a lot of force being applied there! I would try to spread those loads out as much as you can so you don't tear your 9" housing. I doubt the shackle bushings will live long getting twisted but give it a try, if it works I"ll copy you and swap out my noisey tractor link.
Lars I was told for handling it should be longer if possible since it's trying to lift your truck. Also the passenger side was preferred to counter drivetrain torque on the suspension. But whatever it takes to get it in there is better than frying leafs,a driveshaft, output shaft, yoke, ect., etc. It will bind and your springs will have to bend a little to make up for that. I don't think anyones figured out a way around that yet. Sounds like a good job for someone who spends their days underground with a big spinning thingamajig.
The left side of my mount goes from undernieth, all of the way up the front, and across the top. I'm hoping this will be enough to keep it in place without destroying the housing. If you think it will require more support let me know so I can add it before I rip it open. I will be going to some other setup I think to allow more twist in front. I haven't decided yet for certain what it will be though. I jacked up one side to see how well it flexed before the tire lifted and I think it fell short of where it was before. I'm going to retest it again with the new springs which I drove out and picked up this afternoon. One thing I was watching for was anti squat when I was driving it today which I read can be a problem. I was surprised that while it didn't squat down it also didn't lift up in back either. I did notice it had more of a tendacy to lift the front off the line though.

Bronchole
09/08/05, 07:50 AM
The length of the bar and the height of the t-case end of the bar are my biggest "unknowns" for what I have in mind. I would immagine that there is a good compromise position for these, but I have not been able to find anything on how people have determined the correct information for each.

At this point I am considering the idea of taking a bunch of measurments of the position front to back and the rotation of the axle housing while at the normal sitting still position, fully unloaded position (frame on jackstands) and the fully compressed position (load the ass of the Bronchole down with mega weight) take that information and plot it out and see if I can determine a reasonable center of rotation. That would show me what the best length and pivot position for the end of the traction bar would be. The 2 biggest problems will be making the measurments in a way that the information will be usefull, and loading the suspension down to full compression.

MikeM
09/08/05, 10:26 AM
Saddleup,like I said, it looks good. What do you got there? about 18" of weld?!!. ;D I couldn't see the pumpkin side of it so I was just saying once you like where it is then add one more gusset than you think it needs. Your going to lose flex, your trading that for the safety of many components. I also got a big improvement in the bouncey bouncey. Still get it but it's easier to find that sweet spot when laying into the throttle. Mine is about the same length and I don't get any jacking of the rear. The off the line deal could be what people are trying to get rid of by putting the bar on the pssgr side.
Bronchole if you try to preload it it's going to be a real bitch to put back together. Just an fyi. Not trying to discourage you since Lars needs that info to solve the bind issue!

Bronchole
09/08/05, 02:04 PM
Bronchole if you try to preload it it's going to be a real bitch to put back together. Just an fyi. Not trying to discourage you since Lars needs that info to solve the bind issue!

Preload???? What I am going for is a position that the t-case end of the traction bar stays in the same place weather the suspension is un-loaded or fully loaded or anywhere in between. What I am thinking is that if you disconnect the shackel from the traction bar and run the suspension fully through it's travel (no torque applied) a perfect geometry traction bar end should not move at all. The reality is that I doubt this is possible, but I'd like to get it as close as possible.

Conceptually I'd think that the best place for the traction bar end to be would be directly between the front spring bolts. Then the movement of the end would only be the change in the relationship between the center of the axle and the front spring bols as the springs change shape (curved becomes flat). The problem with this concept is that the axle housing rotates as the suspensions moves thru it's travel. I haven't put enough thought in to it to think of how/why this happens. any way you look at it, this rotation will probably not be centered at the spring bolt. so now you have to find the best compromise. Thats why I'd like to do the imperical test rather than thinking it thru.

Bronchole
09/08/05, 02:06 PM
Even better would be to travel test someones Bronco that already has a traction bar on it with a simmilar lift to mine (5.5" 11 leaf) and get a look-see on that. Them make the SWAG from there.

MikeM
09/08/05, 03:39 PM
I took "center of movement" to mean the middlepoint of misalingnment you get at the axle mounts. So building it at that position rather than at rest is what I meant by preload.
I don't think your going to make that circular motion you'd find at the shackle end go away much. The fore/ aft part of it is built into your spring. The rest of it might get better with a shorter arm but that's probably going to create other problems.
I have a 5.5" 11 leaf ladder bar setup, come on up to Norcal and cycle it. I'll buy the beer. ;D

lars
09/08/05, 05:00 PM
I've thought about it plenty. The axle clearly doesn't move in a circular path as the leaf spring compresses/extends, so there's no sweet spot where the t-case end of a bar is moving in a circular arc, let alone sitting still. But there may be a spot that's close to a circular arc, that's also in a reasonable location so that it can be connected to a crossmember via a shackle. I've even considered doing some fancy-shmantzy finite element modeling of the system, since then I could approximate the deformation of the leaf spring. Something that would be tougher to do with a solid modeling program. Best thing: guinea pig Bronco + heavy weights + forklift to load the weights in the Bronco. Mock something up that's easily modified and try it. That would still be a big job, but it would likely lead to the best solution. We've got the forklift and the weights (steel plates, a few thousand pounds worth) here at work. Maybe one of these days.

SaddleUp
09/08/05, 05:22 PM
I may be wrong but I don't think precision here can either be obtained nor do I think it is entirely necessary. The rearend will move through an arc in the back and so will the shackle in the front. The rearend will change direction forward and backward through the arc by maybe a couple of inches through normal articulation which will twist it more than it will move forward and aft in the center. The exception would be when jumping but you will not want to be under full torque at that time anyway. This might amount to a difference of a couple of degrees which will be soaked up by the CV as long as it starts with the pinion in the right position when it is static. As long as the arm is longer than the distance between the front spring mount and the perch and is close to the same plane then it seems to me that the up and down movement at the end will be negligible to binding. Perhaps there will be a slight bind there but I suspect I will have more problems with binding when it twists which is why I will change to a different setup at the shackle to allow more twist there. At least that is how it figures when I shake up the pile of rocks in my noggin. I'll know more after I have a chance to really play with it some more and try a few things.

BUCKETOBOLTS
09/08/05, 07:34 PM
It might be best to use the KISS method here along with the TLAR method for figuring the geometry. It got to be better than not running any traction device at all.

MikeM
09/08/05, 10:28 PM
Lars didn't say the axle, I said the front mount if you unbolted it. Maybe circular was the wrong description, more like an arc with a hook. We need to sit down with some more of those Duvels or whatever those were come up with a new forward mount.

SaddleUp
09/09/05, 12:44 AM
FWIW, Today I removed the left rear spring and reinstalled the new replacement. I do need to make some changed to my spring shackles but I knew that would need to be done already because I had made longer ones (my rear shackles are flipped) to compensate for the lift lost when the springs deformed. When I did this I left the traction bar attached and lifted the side. When I pulled my u-bolts off the axle dropped about 1/2" further down. (To the floor of the trailer) I.E. If it was binding at full droop then I would have struggled to remove and replace the spring with the traction bar still installed. At this point I suspect that I will need to actually put it up on a ramp again to tell if I am limiting the articulation or not. If I find the same thing on the other side then I'm going to hold off on changing the traction bar shackle until I get it up a ramp to see how it does.

eds66bronco
09/09/05, 09:08 AM
just came across this interesting setup and thought i'd throw it it in the mix
;D

http://mo-offroad.com/wrapzapper01.html


any thoughts?

lars
09/09/05, 10:55 AM
just came across this interesting setup and thought i'd throw it it in the mix
;D

http://mo-offroad.com/wrapzapper01.html


any thoughts?

Lots of parts, and the bar is triangulated, but a triangulated bar that connects to the top & bottom of the axle tube like Saddleup's will be stiffer in the direction it's needed most.

I had a 2AM brainstorm last night. Make a mockup bar that's rigidly attached to the axle near the pumpkin. Doesn't matter exactly how, but it can't flop around. At the other end, attach a marker like a Sharpie, aimed parallel to the rear axle (perpendicular to the driveshaft). Now mount some sort of board with a piece of paper to the underside of the Bronco, so the Sharpie contacts it. Next, load/unload the suspension, using heavy weights in the back, etc. The result would be a plot of the motion of the ladder bar. If you repeated it a few times with the front of the mockup bar in different locations, you could see how bar length & angle affects the pattern. From that info one should be able to do some optimization of length, angle, shackle length, etc. Throw in some Duvels and the design would probably look perfect. At least till the Duvels wear off...

ctowery
09/09/05, 11:06 AM
I have a 5.5" 11 leaf ladder bar setup, come on up to Norcal and cycle it. I'll buy the beer. ;D

I'm in gilroy where are ya I would like to see what ya have done.

Cary

ctowery
09/09/05, 11:09 AM
just came across this interesting setup and thought i'd throw it it in the mix
;D

http://mo-offroad.com/wrapzapper01.html


any thoughts?

Looks good but it sure requires more room than I got in my EB.

Cary

MikeM
09/09/05, 12:11 PM
I'm in gilroy where are ya I would like to see what ya have done.

Cary
Cary, I'm in Walnut Creek. Your welcome to come by but the EB doesn't move right now and won't for at least another month. Damm family, work, then toys priority thing! I'd like to see your 351 install as that's next on the list after everything downstream in the drive train is buttoned up. I'll pm you my number.

ctowery
09/09/05, 12:43 PM
Cary, I'm in Walnut Creek. Your welcome to come by but the EB doesn't move right now and won't for at least another month. Damm family, work, then toys priority thing! I'd like to see your 351 install as that's next on the list after everything downstream in the drive train is buttoned up. I'll pm you my number.


O!, ignore my PM, read yours before I read this post.

Cary

sixtysick
09/09/05, 12:45 PM
Here's my setup. Works very well.

I guess I am not understanding how that would promote better traction? Please explain.

SaddleUp
09/09/05, 01:52 PM
just came across this interesting setup and thought i'd throw it it in the mix
;D

http://mo-offroad.com/wrapzapper01.html


any thoughts?
It looks barely better than a single bar to me. Not enough triangulation to it. I also don't see a shackle in front so that would cause binding when it tries to move forward and backward through the travel of the suspension. The other point about it being too big applies as well since it may stick up too far and hit the floorboard.

SaddleUp
09/09/05, 05:20 PM
Here is an update with some new pictures and what I found when I had a chance to really play with the flex some. This still will not replace testing it on a ramp but I figure it did give me a good perspective on whether just using bushing would work or not. Above I posted that my left axle dropped some when I unbolted the u-bolts to replace the spring and that I did the swap without disconnecting the traction bar. I only had about 1/2" between the tire and the floor of the trailer when I was doing this so I don't know how mcuh further I could have extended that side and I was in ahurry at the time so I didn't check it further. Today though when I did the right spring I took more time and lifted it to see how much additional flex I could get beyond the bottom of the springs. The pictures below show the results. I started by pulling jacking it up on the side to get the tire off the floor of the trailer and then pulled the u-bolts loose. As I was doing so I had to continue jacking it up as the axle continued to drop further. After the u-bolts were off I jacked it up until the tire lifted off the floor and took a few pictures. Then when I was installing the new spring I first installed the front spring hanger bolt and then the u-bolts leaving the rear shackle disconnected. Basically I wanted to see if there would be binding when the connection was made between the front hanger and the spring perches. The last picture shows the result. When I looked up under it at the shackle it looks like there is about an inch of side to side travel at the top. I.E. 1/2" deflection to both sides. The bushings did not have any apparent deformation so it appears they are easily soaking up this side to side travel. As mentioned a ramp will tell me more but right now I can't see any binding in it when the springs are at full droop. On the contrary it looks like my flex is limited to what the springs are capable of supplying with a nice cushion in the flex the traction bar will allow.

SaddleUp
09/05/06, 02:06 PM
Just wanted to post a quick update to this thread. Until SOB I really hadn't had a chance to compare the difference with the traction bar on the ramp. Last year at SOB I drove up the ramp 37" in front and backed up the ramp 47". Since then the only things I have done to the suspension are add the traction bar, swap to new leaf springs (Same ones but not S shaped), and shortened the shackles about 1 1/2" (to make up the difference that the back lowered when the springs were bent). This year I drove up the ramp 40" and backed up it 46". The gain in front was 3" and loss in back was 1". Differences in tire pressure alone could account for the 1" loss and shortening the shackle almost certainly impacted it. Taking these into account I don't believe the use of bushings in the traction bar had any negative effects on articulation. The difference in measurements is so small that any given rig could display the same difference on 2 individual trips. (Even the ramp position could have effected it) At any rate here are some pictures from the ramp at SOB X.

scsm76
09/05/06, 06:31 PM
Wow, it took a year to finally test that setup on the ramp. Looks like it is working well. Has it solved the wrap up and hop issues? Looks like it would also double as driveline protection in the rocks.

SaddleUp
09/05/06, 08:11 PM
Wow, it took a year to finally test that setup on the ramp. Looks like it is working well. Has it solved the wrap up and hop issues? Looks like it would also double as driveline protection in the rocks.
I don't really get to too many events. I did put it on a ramp in January but it wasn't set up to really be accurate. More of a fun thing for people to play with. It was on a hill so the measurements wouldn't have been accurate. Other than that I just tested it out on the trails which seemed to have no negative effects. The springs aren't S shaped yet so I think it has fixed my axle wrap problem. As for driveline protection I took that into consideration as well when I positioned the lower bar. It isn't going to protect it from every rock out there but it has already helped with some. (I have scratches under it where it's slid down rocks)