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Electronic Parking Brake Calipers

LSUpete

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Jul 11, 2001
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Have any of you installed this system on your Bronco? If so, would you provide your opinion of the system including installation?

Thanks
 

toddz69

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I presume you're referring to the electric ones from late model Fords etc? 1sicbronconut can give you his perspective from a Ford tech perspective.

Brennan Metcalf has been working on a kit for Jeep rear ends. Something similar could likely be adapted for 9" rear ends as well:

https://brennans-garage.com/products/electric-emergency-brake-eebrake-rear-bracket-kit-41-75-jeep

Wilwood also introduced a setup a year or two ago (I see they actually call theirs an electronic parking brake. Pricey stuff. Don't know anyone that's used it.)

https://www.wilwood.com/brakekits/BrakeKitListRear?mincatdesc=Electronic Parking Brake Rear Retrofit Brake Kit

Todd Z.
 
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Broncobowsher

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I know of 2 ways this is done. One is an electric actuator that pulls cables. There is an aftermarket setup this way I remember seeing at SEMA about 10 years ago. It was a basic linear actuator but some fancy linkage to gain leverage as the brake was applied. It was a slow system.
There is one production vehicle I know of (and probably many more I don't know of) that ran an electric motor to apply cables. Much faster than the aftermarket system. 1st gen Nissan leaf. First 2 years of production, before it was moved to the states. The fastest check is to see if the rear doors are aluminum. After the 3rd year they cost cut the aluminum doors and the actuator and went steel doors and foot actuated park brake.

But I am guessing this isn't what you are thinking of. Many (most?) new cars now have an electric motor built into the caliper. Think the old caddy park brake on disk brakes from the late 70s/early 80s. Only it is a sealed motor and not an arm. They are pretty quick. Run a DC motor that reverses polarity to apply and release. No feedback sensors. It is NOT a continuous application of power. There is probably some current sensing going on with the motors. I have played with a few a little bit. The typical scene is to use a computer service tool to retract and reset the parking brake after a pad change. Although I know techs that have made there own tool using a 9V battery to run the motor in and out. 12V would run the motor faster. But I would worry about the motor if you kept 12V applied after it stalls. I'm sure it would work, but I would be happier if I was running a controller to limit current flow at the limits of travel.
 

JB Fab

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Thanks for the post!
I am on this one, to build driveline brakes for a couple of my rigs.

Cheers,
Jon
 

toddz69

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I know of 2 ways this is done. One is an electric actuator that pulls cables. There is an aftermarket setup this way I remember seeing at SEMA about 10 years ago. It was a basic linear actuator but some fancy linkage to gain leverage as the brake was applied. It was a slow system.
I think you're referring to the E-Stopp, which is quite popular with the street rodding/hot rodding crew:

https://www.estopp.com/

Todd Z.
 

JB Fab

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If you build a kit, I’d be interested in 2 if they will fit under the floor.
Not interested in building a kit, but two of our rigs have Atlas cases with the driveline brake. the E-stop stuff seems more suited to street-rod stuff.
83849346_2560008830913690_7362248749130711040_n.jpg
 

Apogee

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Wilwood also introduced a setup a year or two ago (I see they actually call theirs an electronic parking brake. Pricey stuff. Don't know anyone that's used it.)

https://www.wilwood.com/brakekits/BrakeKitListRear?mincatdesc=Electronic Parking Brake Rear Retrofit Brake Kit

Todd Z.

We've been using the Wilwood EPB and MC4 (mechanical) parking brake calipers on various pro-touring applications for a while with good overall results. They're fairly easy to adapt and install and while the harness is somewhat pricey, it is relatively complete and works as advertised. The last EPB kit we did ran a little over $1100 if I remember correctly for the calipers, pads and harness with the switch and controller/amp...the adapter brackets were custom and specific to the rotor diameter and housing application.

Tobin
 
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LSUpete

LSUpete

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We've been using the Wilwood EPB and MC4 (mechanical) parking brake calipers on various pro-touring applications for a while with good overall results. They're fairly easy to adapt and install and while the harness is somewhat pricey, it is relatively complete and works as advertised. The last EPB kit we did ran a little over $1100 if I remember correctly for the calipers, pads and harness with the switch and controller/amp...the adapter brackets were custom and specific to the rotor diameter and housing application.

Tobin

Which kit/product number did you use?
 

Apogee

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Which kit/product number did you use?

I've used their part number 140-15979-**, noting that they list kits with the red and black caliper finishes, however they also offer a clear hard anodize finish that's a matte gray. These kits work with rotors up to 1.10" thick, noting that I've used them on applications with 26mm [1.02"] and 28mm [1.10"] thick without issue. They make kits for thicker (1.25" - 140-16849-**) and thinner (.81" - 140-15978-**) rotors as well, where they just machine the outer portion of the caliper to match the various rotor thicknesses accordingly. I prefer the symmetric mount they offer over the asymmetric one, but each has it's pros and cons depending on the what you're trying to adapt them onto.
 

ssray

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Interesting reading! I’ve seen the Wilwood EPB but the price is pretty steep along with their brakes. They are lighter being aluminum.

I‘m wondering if those shown in the Brennan link are aluminum. Some of the casting looks light colored like aluminum. Mom has an Edge and I’ve known the brake is electric as I can hear them run when they activate. Never have tried to crawl under for a look see. Probably can’t without a lift or ramps.

I have tried them at low speed and they seem to have pretty good stopping power. Im sure they would lock the wheels on gravel or slippery conditions. Can’t use engine power as putting it in drive and stepping on the throttle automatically releases them. Didn’t think to apply them at low speed and try some throttle while moving.

Would be nice if they could be adapted to our rigs, but I wonder what size tires they could handle if you you could fit them to the rotors. Need to consider the hydraulic as well as parking!

Anyone know if Pickups or the bigger SUV’s are using something like these?
 
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71 CA Bronco

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I just installed a Tesla parlking brake on my GT race car with an aftermarket controller. It's really slick. Tempted to try to adapt to a Bronco someday.
 

Broncobowsher

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Those Wilwood calipers sure look like production calipers I see on so many new cars. I wonder what they are sourced from? Probably going back to a common supplier like Akabono (like how so many manufacturers use Saginaw power steering boxes). I bet a good chunk of the kit costs is that custom controller. Looks like an OEM quality controller and not a first time build. Someone spent some time and money making that module. The brackets to make it bolt up, that is the easy stuff.
 
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LSUpete

LSUpete

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I've used their part number 140-15979-**, noting that they list kits with the red and black caliper finishes, however they also offer a clear hard anodize finish that's a matte gray. These kits work with rotors up to 1.10" thick, noting that I've used them on applications with 26mm [1.02"] and 28mm [1.10"] thick without issue. They make kits for thicker (1.25" - 140-16849-**) and thinner (.81" - 140-15978-**) rotors as well, where they just machine the outer portion of the caliper to match the various rotor thicknesses accordingly. I prefer the symmetric mount they offer over the asymmetric one, but each has it's pros and cons depending on the what you're trying to adapt them onto.

I have a '76 model that came with disc brakes up front. I'm wondering if I could use the Wilwood electronic parking brake system or if this system will only work with a Wilwood disc brake setup.
 

Apogee

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I have a '76 model that came with disc brakes up front. I'm wondering if I could use the Wilwood electronic parking brake system or if this system will only work with a Wilwood disc brake setup.
Since they're standalone calipers, if you can mount and wire them, they should work. Most of Wilwood's EPB kits seem to mount the EPB calipers roughly 90° from the hydraulic brake calipers, which since they don't need to be bleed, makes a certain amount of sense given their bracket designs. In the kits I've done, we've mounted the calipers opposite one another (180°) at 9:00 and 3:00 respectively, more like a dual caliper setup on a Formula Drift car, mostly just because I think it looks better and it allowed us to essentially mirror our existing mounting bracket designs and develop a bracket for the EPB/MC4 calipers without much fuss.

Also, keep in mind that these EPB/MC4 calipers extend inward a decent amount, so on narrow track width applications (or wide frame applications), you'll want to make sure that the inboard part of the caliper body/actuator doesn't hit the frame or other suspension components during articulation or suspension travel. The higher the offset on the rotor, the further inboard the whole assembly will be located.
 

Broncobowsher

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I have a '76 model that came with disc brakes up front. I'm wondering if I could use the Wilwood electronic parking brake system or if this system will only work with a Wilwood disc brake setup.
I'll say no.
The calipers are very deep with the electric motor
Being based for rear brakes, they won't have enough bore (piston surface area) for a front application.

I quit at that point.
 

kman67

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I just installed a Tesla parlking brake on my GT race car with an aftermarket controller. It's really slick. Tempted to try to adapt to a Bronco someday.

Sooo, I installed this on my ‘67 Bronco. It works good as a parking brake. Not great on steep hills and my 37” tires. Its big and had to notch my spring mounting plate
4321793c95d757f73f654d7c25aa39b1.jpg

f7b7bbafcebd4990cfdf9950945942db.jpg



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71 CA Bronco

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IMG_4718.jpg

This is what I did. Used Pantera Electronics controller. Seems to hold the race car well. Its not much weight though. Yours is the first Bronco one I have seen.
 
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