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Track bar drop bracket

Rbuddy98

Contributor
Full Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2018
Messages
161
I have a 2.5 lift with a adjustable track bar and run the drop down bracket along with a dropped pitman arm even though I was told I didn’t need to. It puts the steering geometry back to stock. I have zero issues with my steering.
 

Broncobowsher

Contributor
Total hack
Joined
Jun 4, 2002
Messages
33,453
2½ is a maybe. If you have a stock pitman arm, don't run a drop bracket. Use both together or not at all. When you start getting into tie rod over and axle risers, it still applies. You modify steering and track bar together.

As for it you need it. The stiffer the suspension and the less sensitive the driver is, the less you need it. The softer the suspension and more sensitive the driver the more you want to run one.

There are a couple things going on. One is the aesthetic aspect that a lot of people get tied up in. The axle isn't centered side to side. Simple, as the axle is moved away from the frame the track bar swings in an arc. The greater the vertical distance, the steeper the angle, the more lateral shift. An adjustable (length) track bar can be used to center the axle again. But with so many things there is a trade off. With stock steering you are now not centered in the steering, that is the steering box has uneven travel left to right. Most steering boxes are tightest when on center and have more play off center. Your straight driving is with the steering box off center. You can also run out of travel in the steering box in one direction so you can't turn as tight to the right as you can to the left.
With soft springs there is another oddity. Not truely bumps steer as you can hold the wheel straight, and you drive straight. but bump yaw. The body (and frame) rotate going through dips in the road. The axle goes straight, the track bar swings in its arc, the chassis is pushed sideways. To the left as the suspension compresses, to the right as it extends. There is a very small amount of this in stock form, the track bar nearly horizontal. In a horizontal state there is nearly no lateral shift during normal vertical movement. That is what the drop or lift brackets are trying to achieve again, that horizontal state in normal use.

The steering drag link has to match the track bar. The steering box is giving a movement into the linkage in reference to the frame. What you want is the same movement of the tie rod in reference to the axle tube. Ideally there is no movement in the tie rod to axle as an input from the suspension cycles. For a check you can lock the tie rod to the axle (piece of metal and a few clamps), cycle the suspension and watch for steering wheel movement. Should be none.
 
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Darryl M

Darryl M

Jr. Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
108
Loc.
Angie
Thank you but all that is way over my head. I just need to know what works with my 2.5 in lift and my adjustable track bar. Drop down bracket or not.
 

Shimmy

Contributor
1977 Bronco
Joined
Jun 20, 2021
Messages
400
Loc.
Maple Valley
Thank you but all that is way over my head. I just need to know what works with my 2.5 in lift and my adjustable track bar. Drop down bracket or not.

well as mentioned above it depends with 2.5" of lift. do you have a drop pitman arm? if not, try putting your adjustable TB on and see if you can center your axle.

if you HAVE a drop pitman arm on, then i'd run a TB drop bracket. what year is your bronco?
 

DirtDonk

Contributor
Bronco Guru
Joined
Nov 3, 2003
Messages
43,767
Yes, that’s what they are saying Darryl.
1. If you don’t have a dropped pitman arm, you don’t use a drop bracket.
2. If you do use a dropped pitman arm then you must use a drop bracket. Even if you have an adjustable bar.
3. The old industry standard is that you don’t need a dropped track bar bracket until you are at 3 inches and above. But at 2 1/2 inches you are so close to that, that you can still benefit from them.
At this point it’s entirely up to you.

My own personal feeling is that they are good to use with a 2.5 inch lift. But thousands of Broncos are running around without them still.
Maybe try it without and see if you like it. If not they can be added later.
 
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Darryl M

Darryl M

Jr. Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
108
Loc.
Angie
well as mentioned above it depends with 2.5" of lift. do you have a drop pitman arm? if not, try putting your adjustable TB on and see if you can center your axle.

if you HAVE a drop pitman arm on, then i'd run a TB drop bracket. what year is your bronco?
Thanks so much. I do have a drop pitman arm. My Bronco is a 69
 
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Darryl M

Darryl M

Jr. Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
108
Loc.
Angie
Yes, that’s what they are saying Darryl.
1. If you don’t have a dropped pitman arm, you don’t use a drop bracket.
2. If you do use a dropped pitman arm then you must use a drop bracket. Even if you have an adjustable bar.
3. The old industry standard is that you don’t need a dropped track bar bracket until you are at 3 inches and above. But at 2 1/2 inches you are so close to that, that you can still benefit from them.
At this point it’s entirely up to you.

My own personal feeling is that they are good to use with a 2.5 inch lift. But thousands of Broncos are running around without them still.
Maybe try it without and see if you like it. If not they can be added later.
Thank you
 

Rustytruck

Bronco Guru
Joined
Feb 24, 2002
Messages
10,859
I have a 1974 with the stock power steering and Pittman arm. i use just a drop down bracket I have no bump steer.. all the steering system is stock 1974 Bronco.
 

helo-mech

Contributor
Sr. Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2007
Messages
619
2½ is a maybe. If you have a stock pitman arm, don't run a drop bracket. Use both together or not at all. When you start getting into tie rod over and axle risers, it still applies. You modify steering and track bar together.

As for it you need it. The stiffer the suspension and the less sensitive the driver is, the less you need it. The softer the suspension and more sensitive the driver the more you want to run one.

There are a couple things going on. One is the aesthetic aspect that a lot of people get tied up in. The axle isn't centered side to side. Simple, as the axle is moved away from the frame the track bar swings in an arc. The greater the vertical distance, the steeper the angle, the more lateral shift. An adjustable (length) track bar can be used to center the axle again. But with so many things there is a trade off. With stock steering you are now not centered in the steering, that is the steering box has uneven travel left to right. Most steering boxes are tightest when on center and have more play off center. Your straight driving is with the steering box off center. You can also run out of travel in the steering box in one direction so you can't turn as tight to the right as you can to the left.
With soft springs there is another oddity. Not truely bumps steer as you can hold the wheel straight, and you drive straight. but bump yaw. The body (and frame) rotate going through dips in the road. The axle goes straight, the track bar swings in its arc, the chassis is pushed sideways. To the left as the suspension compresses, to the right as it extends. There is a very small amount of this in stock form, the track bar nearly horizontal. In a horizontal state there is nearly no lateral shift during normal vertical movement. That is what the drop or lift brackets are trying to achieve again, that horizontal state in normal use.

The steering drag link has to match the track bar. The steering box is giving a movement into the linkage in reference to the frame. What you want is the same movement of the tie rod in reference to the axle tube. Ideally there is no movement in the tie rod to axle as an input from the suspension cycles. For a check you can lock the tie rod to the axle (piece of metal and a few clamps), cycle the suspension and watch for steering wheel movement. Should be none.
It will take me another 3 times or more to fully comprehend all of this, but it’s info like this that I try and mark for rainy days.
 
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