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Daughter and Dad '74 restoration

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SuperBroncoDuty

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I might have to call Ford about that motorcraft pickup coil. I get different results when I search and don't want to get what isn't correct. I've got a few pics of that ignition control module
 

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Eastwood

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When I worked in an auto parts store, we could test those ignition modules. I don't know if anyone does that anymore.
 

DirtDonk

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I might have to call Ford about that motorcraft pinup coil. I get different results when I search and don't want to get what isn't correct. I've got a few pics of that ignition control module

As far as I know there was only one pickup coil/stator/reluctor assembly for the breakerless/solid state/Dura Spark ignition systems. So in theory at least all you need is one for a V8 and you're done.
Again, in theory...%)

But they're also very easy to check with an ohm-meter. I'm not sure I agree that they fail twice as often as the modules. Depends on your experiences I guess. My personal experience has been the opposite.
With an ohm-meter's test probes on the Purple and Orange wires, you should see a reading of between 400 and 700 ohms. If it's outside of that range, it's done for.
In fact, it's probably not a bad practice to replace it if it's anywhere near the extremes of that range. But no real reason to replace it unless it's bad.
If you do, then clean up the old one and stick it in a small box in your parts drawer for future emergencies. Or in your parts stash in the back of the Bronco for those epic road trips with the family down the road!

Module (also called a "modulator" by Ford) is the Black Grommet model. The "grommet" actually being a wire strain relief, or "sealing block" in some Ford literature, but grommet works too and is easier to say. So that's what most call it.
I thought the Black grommet was a one-year only model for '74, but maybe it carried over to '75 too. But I also thought they were supposed to have 7 wires and I only see 6 in your pics.
Could be wrong on that, but I have a book I can check when I get the chance. If jckkys sees this he can probably comment from memory.

Paul
 
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SuperBroncoDuty

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Thanks Paul. My mechanic friend said I could borrow his ohm meter but it would have to be Sunday when he gets home from the beach. Wth lol. I guess it's cheaper to borrow one but I also think it wouldn't hurt if I had my own. My ignition control module should be here this afternoon. So, last night I figured I'd start looking at the brake drums. I pretty much know that all of the brake lines and stuff have to be replaced. They are bad and in some places rusted completely into. So this is the passenger rear. Not sure if this is good and just needs a good cleaning or any of it is bad and needs replaced. I see where a lot of people of done the swap to disc brakes BUT, is it required or is personal preference?
 

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Eastwood

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I'm still running the factory drums on my 77' with 30'' tires. Drum brakes are fine if you're staying close to stock specs. I do have power disc in the front so that helps. I would get all new shoes, wheel cylinders and hardware kits to totally renew the brakes all the way around. Only do one wheel at a time. Sometimes it gets confusing on how everything fits and you can go look at another wheel to see how fits together.
 
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SuperBroncoDuty

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I would like to keep it as factory as possible. Just didn't know if there were safety issues or anything with people swapping to discs. And I'm trying to get out as cheap as possible but still keeping safety at the top of my list. So far everything I've been doing is confusing so I'm just going to add this to my list hahaha. I know once I get it cranked or running, the brakes would be the next thing anyway before I could let my daughter take her out for a spin
 
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SuperBroncoDuty

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Ok, question. If I buy all new parts to replace drum brakes and the master cylinder also needs replacing, is there a list in this forum of every single thing that I will need to get so that nothing is left out on the brake system?

Next question. When and while I have the drums off, is there anything about the axles that I need to do or look at? I know I need to tackle one thing at a time even though something else might interrupt that process. Are there pictures of certain things I need to post prior to brakes? Thanks in advance
 

Rustytruck

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the black strain relief was on 1974 model Broncos for California and Florida and maybe other states too. the 50 state models still had points in 1974. as for the wiring difference between 6 or 7 wires there were running changes in design where most aftermarket modules dropped the redundant extra ground wire. if you buy one of these modules new there is always a notation of the change in the paperwork inside the box.
 

sprdv1

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Thanks Paul. My mechanic friend said I could borrow his ohm meter but it would have to be Sunday when he gets home from the beach. Wth lol. I guess it's cheaper to borrow one but I also think it wouldn't hurt if I had my own. My ignition control module should be here this afternoon. So, last night I figured I'd start looking at the brake drums. I pretty much know that all of the brake lines and stuff have to be replaced. They are bad and in some places rusted completely into. So this is the passenger rear. Not sure if this is good and just needs a good cleaning or any of it is bad and needs replaced. I see where a lot of people of done the swap to disc brakes BUT, is it required or is personal preference?

never hurts to have your own.. lol
 

Yeller

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For even hard core off road use I find 11” rear drum brakes more than adequate. Discs are nice and do work well but well maintained drums are more than up to the task of safe braking. In the front disc brakes are the only way to go. Front drums do work but vigilance is required for them to truly be effective and even then still not as good as discs.
 

JeepGuy

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Thanks Paul. My mechanic friend said I could borrow his ohm meter but it would have to be Sunday when he gets home from the beach. Wth lol. I guess it's cheaper to borrow one but I also think it wouldn't hurt if I had my own. My ignition control module should be here this afternoon. So, last night I figured I'd start looking at the brake drums. I pretty much know that all of the brake lines and stuff have to be replaced. They are bad and in some places rusted completely into. So this is the passenger rear. Not sure if this is good and just needs a good cleaning or any of it is bad and needs replaced. I see where a lot of people of done the swap to disc brakes BUT, is it required or is personal preference?

Cool upgrade, but definitely not a must do. I run rear drums, front disc on the jeep with heavy 35" tires. Never an issue stopping.

Unless you really want to do a swap, I'd just rebuild the existing brakes, new pads, springs, slave cylinders, and call it good. Make sure your E Brakes lines are in good condition as this would be a good time to replace them if needed.

Seals and bearings wouldn't be too bad of an idea, but unless you see leakage or something else around the ends I wouldn't worry about them yet. If you decide to gear it later, then those refreshes are a no brainer.
 

sprdv1

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For even hard core off road use I find 11” rear drum brakes more than adequate. Discs are nice and do work well but well maintained drums are more than up to the task of safe braking. In the front disc brakes are the only way to go. Front drums do work but vigilance is required for them to truly be effective and even then still not as good as discs.

I got to freshen up mine before the next trip.. I agree wit ya though
 

DirtDonk

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I guess it's cheaper to borrow one but I also think it wouldn't hurt if I had my own.

Absolutely! Anyone that owns an older vehicle will find even a cheap Harbor Freight (usually under 6 bucks) meter handy more often than they really want to believe.
It's not a deal-breaker to not own one, but they sure make life easier by getting rid of some of the guesses.

I pretty much know that all of the brake lines and stuff have to be replaced. They are bad and in some places rusted completely into.

Yep, you're on the right track. Brakes are important, and good working brakes are imperative. Replace the soft hoses as well. They deteriorate, sometimes from the inside out, and it's another one of those "well, while I'm here..." things.

So this is the passenger rear. Not sure if this is good and just needs a good cleaning or any of it is bad and needs replaced.

Well, it looks almost worn out to me. It's serviceable with that thickness of friction material left, but if you compare it to a new pair of shoes you'll see the difference.
So another, while you're in there...

Because judging by the fluid leaking inside the drum, the wheel cylinder needs replacing. Might as well do the rest...

I see where a lot of people of done the swap to disc brakes BUT, is it required or is personal preference?

As the others have said, definitely not a requirement. The rear drums are adequate for most of us, while the fronts are well updated to discs.
The main reason to go with discs in the rear is for convenience in replacing pads, and for lack of routine maintenance needed compared to drums. The drums are not that bad, but if you get a setup where the automatic self-adjusting feature is frequently absent, or non-existent altogether, discs are a real time-saver in the long run.
But run with what you have for now and avoid the swap hassles. See what you've got after renewing them and go from there.

Ok, question. If I buy all new parts to replace drum brakes and the master cylinder also needs replacing, is there a list in this forum of every single thing that I will need to get so that nothing is left out on the brake system?

Maybe, but probably not. This is one of the more knowledgeable sites, with probably the least number of data-sheets on parts and service on the internet!
Some sites have every part you need for any project listed down to the nut, bolt and washer, in nice chart form. I guess we just prefer to do our own digging and talk about it each time!

Next question. When and while I have the drums off, is there anything about the axles that I need to do or look at?

Absolutely!!!! The rear wheel bearings... As I think was already mentioned as well.
Without a doubt you need to inspect them and replace them if there is any doubt as to their condition. They are a non-serviceable part that is merely replaced when they wear out. They do not have a set time or mileage limit and each one depends on it's life's use/abuse history. But we have noticed a pattern...
By the time the bearings get about 100,000 miles on them, it's time to start thinking about replacing them.
By the time they've reached their 40 year mark, it's probably time to replace them just because!
If there is any doubt as to their age, just replace them and then you'll know for the future.

If you have a receipt for new ones, or if the PO (previous owner) is still available for questions, you might find out you're good to go there. But in lieu of those, inspect and test. When you get to that point we can run down characteristics that might indicate they're good or bad. But don't ignore them.
Replace the seals as well.

Inspect the axle shafts for damage to the splined area at the inner end, and for grooving in the seal area (from the seal riding on it for 50 years) and fix/repair/replace if damaged.

This is a good time to replace the gear oil that keeps everything alive in there. You'd be surprised at how many Broncos (and likely other vehicles of the era) have never had their gear lubes changed. Owners seem to change the engine oil regularly (too regularly usually) but ignore all the other lubricants.
Time to knuckle down then, and give the Bronco it's once-over in that regard too. Oils and other lubricants are cheap insurance for a long, happy and safe life with an old vehicle.

I know I need to tackle one thing at a time even though something else might interrupt that process. Are there pictures of certain things I need to post prior to brakes?

Most of the things we need to do to our Broncos have been documented here on the forums. Some are well written about in the Tech Articles section elsewhere. Others are cleverly hidden and in need of searching out, while others will just get new pics and instructions posted up to your questions.
We're organized in our chaos here on classicbroncos!

Paul
 

bax

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When you start to dive deep, I find it way easier to just pull the body off. Easier to work on, easier to fix. It's one piece art a time. You can make a wood body cart pretty easy. Looks like fun, Git er done
 
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